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Fighting for Education Equity, Reform and Innovation

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    **The Edvocate is pleased to publish guest posts as way to fuel important conversations surrounding P-20 education in America. The opinions contained within guest posts are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official opinion of The Edvocate or Dr. Matthew Lynch.** A guest post by Michael Linsin There is a lot of bad classroom management information out there. Now more than ever. Not a month goes by that we don’t hear of another irresponsible method being promoted. We hope to list our top ten worst strategies in a future article, but today we’d like to cover […]

    The post The trendy classroom management strategy you should never use appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    **The Edvocate is pleased to publish guest posts as way to fuel important conversations surrounding P-20 education in America. The opinions contained within guest posts are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official opinion of The Edvocate or Dr. Matthew Lynch.** A guest post by Beth Ellor “I believe the purpose of public schools is to educate not exclude children and to help identify and meet child needs, not make children serve adult convenience, self interest, and systems.” So begins the article published in the 9/26/14 Newsletter of the Children’s Defense Fund, written by Marian Wright Edelman. Please […]

    The post Decriminalizing the Classroom: School climate Bill of Rights appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Shane Duggan Universities are being urged to make their admission process more transparent following the release of a report by the Higher Education Standards Panel, which was set up by the government to help with reforming areas of higher education. The rapid expansion of the university sector has led to a disparity of admissions practices, with equivalent courses at different institutions potentially having wildly different admissions requirements. Earlier this year, a Fairfax media investigation revealed up to 63.5% of students at some universities were being admitted to courses of study below the advertised Australian Tertiary Admission […]

    The post Making university admissions process more transparent is important, but won’t help improve equity appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Chris Husbands It is one of the remarkable transformations of our time: the world is going to university, and participation in higher education is increasing. On every continent, more young people are going to university than ever before, and increasing numbers are graduating. In the UK, over a third of 18-year-olds go to university – and that figure is higher in the US, Canada and Korea, and rising fast in China and Africa. As a result, around the world, governments are challenging their university systems to play an ever greater part in generating knowledge, educating highly […]

    The post Why the TEF could change the way students think about a university education appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Suzanne Rice The national report on National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) outcomes has been released today, showing the test results of Australian students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. The report outlines student achievement in reading, numeracy, spelling, and grammar and punctuation, and shows performance has stagnated. Around 95% percent of students are included in NAPLAN results, meaning they provide a reasonable guide to how well Australian students are learning core skills. Other than Year 9 writing, over the last few years, overall Australian achievement has flatlined – it hasn’t gone […]

    The post NAPLAN results reveal little change in literacy and numeracy performance – here are some key takeaway findings appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Amanda Wise Singapore has topped the global Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings in maths, science and reading, while countries including Australia, France and the UK sit in the bottom batch of OECD countries for achievement in these areas. So what is Singapore doing right, and do other countries want to emulate it? Clearly there are things to learn. Singapore has invested heavily in its education system. Its teachers are the best and brightest, and it has developed highly successful pedagogic approaches to science, maths, engineering and technology (STEM) teaching, such as the “Maths […]

    The post Behind Singapore’s PISA rankings success – and why other countries may not want to join the race appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Bruce Chapman The Grattan Institute has proposed that a 15% surcharge should be added to the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debt of undergraduate and college students. The surcharge is not an up front fee. It is a fee that is added to the existing debt and paid later, depending on a graduate’s future income. Repayments are only made if a graduate’s income exceeds about A$56,000 per annum. This flat rate means that, while a graduate’s loan would initially increase by 15%, that figure would not get bigger over time. Currently full-fee undergraduates pay a […]

    The post The case for a fixed 15% fee on all student loans appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Vincent Geiger Australia is struggling to improve its performance in maths due to a lack of continuity in policymaking. While Australia tends to plan in three-year cycles, the countries that are performing the best – or making significant improvements – in international rankings for maths, such as Singapore, Finland and Japan – tend to revise their maths curriculum every five to six years. This allows teachers to become fully acquainted with new initiatives and provides time for the bedding down of any changes to previous practice. It also allows curriculum developers and system administrators to […]

    The post For Australia to improve in maths, policymakers need to make a plan and stick to it appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    By Matthew Lynch Students from low-income homes hit the K-12 scene at a disadvantage. Materially, they often do not have the means for the resources they need for basic classroom functions. In non-tangible ways, they often do not have the same academic support as middle- or high-income peers and know less when they arrive in Kindergarten.When parents are unable to provide for their children, that responsibility then falls on the schools and the community. Ensuring that students from low income households succeed in K-12 classrooms is multi-faceted and must include: Physiological considerations. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, students need […]

    The post How to Help Low-Income Students Succeed appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    In this multi-part series, I provide a dissection of the phenomenon of retention and social promotion. Also, I describe the many different methods that would improve student instruction in classrooms and eliminate the need for retention and social promotion if combined effectively. While reading this series, periodically ask yourself this question: Why are educators, parents and the American public complicit in a practice that does demonstrable harm to children and the competitive future of the country? Student assessment is a necessary evil of the teaching profession but what is actually most effective? Ankur Singh, formerly a student at the University of Missouri–Columbia, took an […]

    The post Pass or Fail: Multiple Assessments to Determine True Learning appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    In this multi-part series, I provide a dissection of the phenomenon of retention and social promotion. Also, I describe the many different methods that would improve student instruction in classrooms and eliminate the need for retention and social promotion if combined effectively. While reading this series, periodically ask yourself this question: Why are educators, parents and the American public complicit in a practice that does demonstrable harm to children and the competitive future of the country? When it comes to assessing what students have learned, there is a mixed review from educators. A few view the current way we assess students as on point, […]

    The post Pass or Fail: How Did We Get to This Assessment Place? appeared first on The Edvocate.


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    This article was written by Chris Husbands It is one of the remarkable transformations of our time: the world is going to university, and participation in higher education is increasing. On every continent, more young people are going to university than ever before, and increasing numbers are graduating. In the UK, over a third of 18-year-olds go to university – and that figure is higher in the US, Canada and Korea, and rising fast in China and Africa. As a result, around the world, governments are challenging their university systems to play an ever greater part in generating knowledge, educating highly […]

    The post Why the TEF could change the way students think about a university education appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    This article was written by Suzanne Rice The national report on National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) outcomes has been released today, showing the test results of Australian students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. The report outlines student achievement in reading, numeracy, spelling, and grammar and punctuation, and shows performance has stagnated. Around 95% percent of students are included in NAPLAN results, meaning they provide a reasonable guide to how well Australian students are learning core skills. Other than Year 9 writing, over the last few years, overall Australian achievement has flatlined – it hasn’t gone […]

    The post NAPLAN results reveal little change in literacy and numeracy performance – here are some key takeaway findings appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    This article was written by Amanda Wise Singapore has topped the global Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings in maths, science and reading, while countries including Australia, France and the UK sit in the bottom batch of OECD countries for achievement in these areas. So what is Singapore doing right, and do other countries want to emulate it? Clearly there are things to learn. Singapore has invested heavily in its education system. Its teachers are the best and brightest, and it has developed highly successful pedagogic approaches to science, maths, engineering and technology (STEM) teaching, such as the “Maths […]

    The post Behind Singapore’s PISA rankings success – and why other countries may not want to join the race appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    This article was written by Bruce Chapman The Grattan Institute has proposed that a 15% surcharge should be added to the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) debt of undergraduate and college students. The surcharge is not an up front fee. It is a fee that is added to the existing debt and paid later, depending on a graduate’s future income. Repayments are only made if a graduate’s income exceeds about A$56,000 per annum. This flat rate means that, while a graduate’s loan would initially increase by 15%, that figure would not get bigger over time. Currently full-fee undergraduates pay a […]

    The post The case for a fixed 15% fee on all student loans appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    This article was written by Vincent Geiger Australia is struggling to improve its performance in maths due to a lack of continuity in policymaking. While Australia tends to plan in three-year cycles, the countries that are performing the best – or making significant improvements – in international rankings for maths, such as Singapore, Finland and Japan – tend to revise their maths curriculum every five to six years. This allows teachers to become fully acquainted with new initiatives and provides time for the bedding down of any changes to previous practice. It also allows curriculum developers and system administrators to […]

    The post For Australia to improve in maths, policymakers need to make a plan and stick to it appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    By Matthew Lynch Students from low-income homes hit the K-12 scene at a disadvantage. Materially, they often do not have the means for the resources they need for basic classroom functions. In non-tangible ways, they often do not have the same academic support as middle- or high-income peers and know less when they arrive in Kindergarten.When parents are unable to provide for their children, that responsibility then falls on the schools and the community. Ensuring that students from low income households succeed in K-12 classrooms is multi-faceted and must include: Physiological considerations. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, students need […]

    The post How to Help Low-Income Students Succeed appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    In this multi-part series, I provide a dissection of the phenomenon of retention and social promotion. Also, I describe the many different methods that would improve student instruction in classrooms and eliminate the need for retention and social promotion if combined effectively. While reading this series, periodically ask yourself this question: Why are educators, parents and the American public complicit in a practice that does demonstrable harm to children and the competitive future of the country? Student assessment is a necessary evil of the teaching profession but what is actually most effective? Ankur Singh, formerly a student at the University of Missouri–Columbia, took an […]

    The post Pass or Fail: Multiple Assessments to Determine True Learning appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    In this multi-part series, I provide a dissection of the phenomenon of retention and social promotion. Also, I describe the many different methods that would improve student instruction in classrooms and eliminate the need for retention and social promotion if combined effectively. While reading this series, periodically ask yourself this question: Why are educators, parents and the American public complicit in a practice that does demonstrable harm to children and the competitive future of the country? When it comes to assessing what students have learned, there is a mixed review from educators. A few view the current way we assess students as on point, […]

    The post Pass or Fail: How Did We Get to This Assessment Place? appeared first on The Edvocate.


    0 0

    In this multi-part series, I provide a dissection of the phenomenon of retention and social promotion. Also, I describe the many different methods that would improve student instruction in classrooms and eliminate the need for retention and social promotion if combined effectively. While reading this series, periodically ask yourself this question: Why are educators, parents and the American public complicit in a practice that does demonstrable harm to children and the competitive future of the country? Obviously a multi-age classroom has children of different ages – but other than that factor, what would an ideal multi-age classroom look like? The […]

    The post Pass or Fail: An Ideal Multi-Age Classroom appeared first on The Edvocate.


(Page 1) | 2 | newer